Bladder cancer treatment

Bladder cancer treatment

Bladder Cancer Treatment

Types of bladder cancer

Different types of cells in your bladder can become cancerous. The type of bladder cell where cancer begins determines the type of bladder cancer. Doctors use this information to determine which treatments may work best for you.

Types of bladder cancer include:

. Urothelial carcinoma. Urothelial carcinoma, previously called transitional cell carcinoma, occurs in the cells that line the inside of the bladder. Urothelial cells expand when your bladder is full and contract when your bladder is empty. These same cells line the inside of the ureters and the urethra, and cancers can form in those places as well. Urothelial carcinoma is the most common type of bladder cancer in the United States.

. Squamous cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma is associated with chronic irritation of the bladder — for instance, from an infection or from long-term use of a urinary catheter. Squamous cell bladder cancer is rare in the United States. It's more common in parts of the world where a certain parasitic infection (schistosomiasis) is a common cause of bladder infections.

. Adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma begins in cells that make up mucus-secreting glands in the bladder. Adenocarcinoma of the bladder is very rare.

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About Iranian Surgery

Iranian surgery is an online medical tourism platform where you can find the best Surgeons to treat your Bladder cancer in Iran. The price of treating a Bladder cancer in Iran can vary according to each individual’s case and will be determined by the type of Bladder cancer treatment you undergo and an in-person assessment with the doctor. So if you are looking for the cost of Bladder cancer treatment in Iran, you can contact us and get free consultation from Iranian surgery.

Bladder Cancer Treatment by Stage

Your doctor can rate bladder cancer with a staging system that goes from stages 0 to 4 to identify how far the cancer has spread. The stages of bladder cancer mean the following:

. Stage 0 bladder cancer hasn’t spread past the lining of the bladder.

. Stage 1 bladder cancer has spread past the lining of the bladder, but it hasn’t reached the layer of muscle in the bladder.

. Stage 2 bladder cancer has spread to the layer of muscle in the bladder.

. Stage 3 bladder cancer has spread into the tissues that surround the bladder.

. Stage 4 bladder cancer has spread past the bladder to the neighboring areas of the body.

Your doctor will work with you to decide what treatment to provide based on the type and stage of your bladder cancer, your symptoms, and your overall health.

. Treatment for stage 0 and stage 1

Treatment for stage 0 and stage 1 bladder cancer may include surgery to remove the tumor from the bladder, chemotherapy, or immunotherapy, which involves taking a medication that causes your immune system to attack the cancer cells.

. Treatment for stage 2 and stage 3

Treatment for stage 2 and stage 3 bladder cancer may include:

. Removal of part of the bladder in addition to chemotherapy

. Removal of the whole bladder, which is a radical cystectomy, followed by surgery to create a new way for urine to exit the body.

. Chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or immunotherapy that can be done to shrink the tumor before surgery, to treat the cancer when surgery isn’t an option, to kill remaining cancer cells after surgery, or to prevent the cancer from recurring.

. Treatment for stage 4 bladder cancer

Treatment for stage 4 bladder cancer may include:

. Chemotherapy without surgery to relieve symptoms and extend life

. Radical cystectomy and removal of the surrounding lymph nodes, followed by a surgery to create a new way for urine to exit the body.

. Chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and immunotherapy after surgery to kill remaining cancer cells or to relieve symptoms and extend life.

. Clinical trial drugs

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Bladder Cancer Treatment

Treatment options for bladder cancer

Treatment options for bladder cancer depend on a number of factors, including the type of cancer, grade of the cancer and stage of the cancer, which are taken into consideration along with your overall health and your treatment preferences.

Bladder cancer treatment may include:

. Surgery, to remove the cancer cells

. Chemotherapy in the bladder (intravesical chemotherapy), to treat cancers that are confined to the lining of the bladder but have a high risk of recurrence or progression to a higher stage.

. Chemotherapy for the whole body (systemic chemotherapy), to increase the chance for a cure in a person having surgery to remove the bladder, or as a primary treatment when surgery isn't an option.

. Radiation therapy, to destroy cancer cells, often as a primary treatment when surgery isn't an option or isn't desired.

. Immunotherapy, to trigger the body's immune system to fight cancer cells, either in the bladder or throughout the body.

. Targeted therapy, to treat advanced cancer when other treatments haven't helped.

A combination of treatment approaches may be recommended by your doctor and members of your care team.

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Bladder cancer surgery

Approaches to bladder cancer surgery might include:

. Transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). TURBT is a procedure to diagnose bladder cancer and to remove cancers confined to the inner layers of the bladder — those that aren't yet muscle-invasive cancers. During the procedure, a surgeon passes an electric wire loop through a cystoscope and into the bladder. The electric current in the wire is used to cut away or burn away the cancer. Alternatively, a high-energy laser may be used.

Because doctors perform the procedure through the urethra, you won't have any cuts (incisions) in your abdomen.

As part of the TURBT procedure, your doctor may recommend a one-time injection of cancer-killing medication (chemotherapy) into your bladder to destroy any remaining cancer cells and to prevent cancer from coming back. The medication remains in your bladder for a period of time and then is drained.

. Cystectomy. Cystectomy is surgery to remove all or part of the bladder. During a partial cystectomy, your surgeon removes only the portion of the bladder that contains a single cancerous tumor.

A radical cystectomy is an operation to remove the entire bladder and the surrounding lymph nodes. In men, radical cystectomy typically includes removal of the prostate and seminal vesicles. In women, radical cystectomy may involve removal of the uterus, ovaries and part of the vagina.

Radical cystectomy can be performed through an incision on the lower portion of the belly or with multiple small incisions using robotic surgery. During robotic surgery, the surgeon sits at a nearby console and uses hand controls to precisely move robotic surgical instruments.

. Neobladder reconstruction. After a radical cystectomy, your surgeon must create a new way for urine to leave your body (urinary diversion). One option for urinary diversion is neobladder reconstruction. Your surgeon creates a sphere-shaped reservoir out of a piece of your intestine. This reservoir, often called a neobladder, sits inside your body and is attached to your urethra. The neobladder allows most people to urinate normally. A small number of people difficulty emptying the neobladder and may need to use a catheter periodically to drain all the urine from the neobladder.

. Ileal conduit. For this type of urinary diversion, your surgeon creates a tube (ileal conduit) using a piece of your intestine. The tube runs from your ureters, which drain your kidneys, to the outside of your body, where urine empties into a pouch (urostomy bag) you wear on your abdomen.

. Continent urinary reservoir. During this type of urinary diversion procedure, your surgeon uses a section of intestine to create a small pouch (reservoir) to hold urine, located inside your body. You drain urine from the reservoir through an opening in your abdomen using a catheter a few times each day.

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Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy treatment for bladder cancer usually involves two or more chemotherapy drugs used in combination.

Chemotherapy drugs can be given:

. Through a vein (intravenously). Intravenous chemotherapy is frequently used before bladder removal surgery to increase the chances of curing the cancer. Chemotherapy may also be used to kill cancer cells that might remain after surgery. In certain situations, chemotherapy may be combined with radiation therapy.

. Directly into the bladder (intravesical therapy). During intravesical chemotherapy, a tube is passed through your urethra directly to your bladder. The chemotherapy is placed in the bladder for a set period of time before being drained. It can be used as the primary treatment for superficial bladder cancer, where the cancer cells affect only the lining of the bladder and not the deeper muscle tissue.

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Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy uses beams of powerful energy, such as X-rays and protons, to destroy the cancer cells. Radiation therapy for bladder cancer usually is delivered from a machine that moves around your body, directing the energy beams to precise points.

Radiation therapy is sometimes combined with chemotherapy to treat bladder cancer in certain situations, such as when surgery isn't an option or isn't desired.

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Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy is a drug treatment that helps your immune system to fight cancer.

Immunotherapy can be given:

. Directly into the bladder (intravesical therapy). Intravesical immunotherapy might be recommended after TURBT for small bladder cancers that haven't grown into the deeper muscle layers of the bladder. This treatment uses bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), which was developed as a vaccine used to protect against tuberculosis. BCG causes an immune system reaction that directs germ-fighting cells to the bladder.

. Through a vein (intravenously). Immunotherapy can be given intravenously for bladder cancer that's advanced or that comes back after initial treatment. Several immunotherapy drugs are available. These drugs help your immune system identify and fight the cancer cells.

Targeted therapy

Targeted therapy drugs focus on specific weaknesses present within cancer cells. By targeting these weaknesses, targeted drug treatments can cause cancer cells to die. Your cancer cells may be tested to see if targeted therapy is likely to be effective.

Targeted therapy may be an option for treating advanced bladder cancer when other treatments haven't helped.

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Bladder preservation

In certain situations, people with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who don't want to undergo surgery to remove the bladder may consider trying a combination of treatments instead. Known as trimodality therapy, this approach combines TURBT, chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

First, your surgeon performs a TURBT procedure to remove as much of the cancer as possible from your bladder while preserving bladder function. After TURBT, you undergo a regimen of chemotherapy along with radiation therapy.

If, after trying trimodality therapy, not all of the cancer is gone or you have a recurrence of muscle-invasive cancer, your doctor may recommend a radical cystectomy.

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1How long will you live if you have bladder cancer?
For example, if the 5-year relative survival rate for a specific stage of bladder cancer is 90%, it means that people who have that cancer are, on average, about 90% as likely as people who don't have that cancer to live for at least 5 years after being diagnosed.
2Is cancer of the bladder curable?
These cancers can be cured with treatment. During long-term follow-up care, more superficial cancers are often found in the bladder or in other parts of the urinary system. Although these new cancers do need to be treated, they rarely are deeply invasive or life threatening.
3What are the 3 types of bladder cancer?
The 3 main types of bladder cancer are: Urothelial carcinoma. Urothelial carcinoma (or UCC) accounts for about 90% of all bladder cancers. ... Urothelial carcinoma is sometimes also called transitional cell carcinoma or TCC.
4What are the symptoms of late stage bladder cancer?
The signs and symptoms of bladder cancer that has spread to other parts of the body include: tiredness or weakness. pain when urinating. difficulty urinating or inability to urinate. pain in the lower back on one side of the body. weight loss. swollen feet. bone pain.
5Does bladder cancer spread quickly?
Bladder cancer is an abnormal growth or tumor arising from the lining of the bladder. ... The cells grow abnormally fast causing a tumor to sprout up from the flat lining into a growth projecting into the interior of the bladder cavity. In general, tumors at this stage are not life-threatening.
6What happens if bladder cancer is left untreated?
Approximately a third of the 70,000 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer in the USA in 2009 will have presented with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) requiring aggressive management. Left untreated, most patients with MIBC suffer significant morbidity and die of the disease within 2 years of the diagnosis.
7Is bladder cancer a death sentence?
Andy Williams' Bladder Cancer: No Death Sentence. Singer Andy Williams, 83, stunned his fans on Saturday by announcing that he has bladder cancer. ... Three-quarters of patients are diagnosed when the cancer is in its early stages. And for them, there is at least a five-year, disease-free survival rate of about 75 percent.
8How long can you live with stage 3 bladder cancer?
Stage 3. Around 30 out of 100 men (around 30%) and more than 15 out of 100 women (more than 15%) survive their cancer for 5 years or more after they are diagnosed. Stage 3 means that the cancer has grown through the muscle into the fat layer. It may have spread outside the bladder to the prostate, womb or vagina.
9What is the survival rate of bladder cancer?
Percent means how many out of 100. The general 5-year survival rate for people with bladder cancer is 77%. The overall 10-year survival rate is 70% and the overall 15-year survival rate is 65%. However, survival rates depend on many factors, including the type and stage of bladder cancer that is diagnosed.
10Does bladder cancer have stages?
Stage I: The cancer has grown through the inner lining of the bladder and into the lamina propria. ... It is also called invasive cancer or muscle-invasive cancer. The tumor has not reached the fatty tissue surrounding the bladder and has not spread to the lymph nodes or other organs
11How long can you live with bladder cancer untreated?
Well, I think most of us in this room will agree that if left untreated most patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer will have significant morbidity, and will die from the disease within two years of diagnosis. So, a life expectancy of two years has been suggested to be a benchmark to consider radical cystectomy.
12What is the first sign of bladder cancer?
In most cases, blood in the urine (called hematuria) is the first sign of bladder cancer. There may be enough blood to change the color of the urine to orange, pink, or, less often, dark red.
13How is bladder cancer detected?
Tests and procedures used to diagnose bladder cancer may include: Cystoscopy. ... The cystoscope has a lens that allows your doctor to see the inside of your urethra and bladder, to examine these structures for signs of disease. Biopsy
14How do you pee after bladder removal?
Cystectomy (sis-TEK-tuh-me) is a surgery to remove the urinary bladder. In men, removing the entire bladder (radical cystectomy) typically includes removal of the prostate and seminal vesicles. In women, radical cystectomy also involves removal of the uterus, ovaries and part of the vagina.
15What are the symptoms of stage 2 bladder cancer?
Blood in the urine is often one of the first signs of bladder cancer. You might also have some discomfort or pain when you urinate. Symptoms of stage 2 bladder cancer may also include: frequent urination.
16What is the main cause of bladder cancer?
These abnormal cells form a tumor. Causes of bladder cancer include: Smoking and other tobacco use. Exposure to chemicals, especially working in a job that requires exposure to chemicals

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