Hip Replacement Cost

Hip replacement cost

Table of Contents

Hip Replacement

What is Hip Replacement?

How much does a hip replacement cost?

A hip replacement, or hip arthroplasty, is surgery that replaces a diseased or injured hip joint by with an artificial joint or implant. People usually receive hip replacements when arthritis causes severe hip pain and inflammation. Hip fracture and natural wear-and-tear are also common reasons for hip replacement surgery.

General information about Hip Replacement Surgery

The following table describes general information about Hip Replacement surgery including Hip Replacement surgery cost in Iran, recovery time, and to name but a few.

General Information  
Cost Starts from $ 3500
Anesthesia General
Hospital Stay 4-8 Days
Back to Work 6 Weeks
Duration of Operation 1 to 2 Hours
Minimum Stay in Iran 4 Weeks
About Iranian Surgery

Iranian surgery is an online medical tourism platform where you can find the best orthopedic Surgeons and hospitals in Iran. The price of a Hip Replacement procedure in Iran can vary according to each individual’s case and will be determined based on photos and an in-person assessment with the doctor. So if you are looking for the cost of Hip Replacement procedure in Iran, you can contact us and get free consultation from Iranian surgery.

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Before Hip Replacement

Anatomy

The hip is one of the body’s largest joints. It is a ball-and-socket joint. The socket is formed by the acetabulum, which is part of the pelvis bone. The ball is the femoral head, which is the upper end of the femur (thighbone).

The bone surfaces of the ball and socket are covered with articular cartilage, a smooth tissue that cushions the ends of the bones and enables them to move easily.

A thin tissue called the synovial membrane surrounds the hip joint. In a healthy hip, this membrane makes a small amount of fluid that lubricates the cartilage and eliminates almost all friction during hip movement.

Bands of tissue called ligaments (the hip capsule) connect the ball to the socket and provide stability to the joint.

Why it’s done

Conditions that can damage the hip joint, sometimes making hip replacement surgery necessary, include:

. Osteoarthritis. Commonly known as wear-and-tear arthritis, osteoarthritis damages the slick cartilage that covers the ends of bones and helps joints move smoothly.

. Rheumatoid arthritis. Caused by an overactive immune system, rheumatoid arthritis produces a type of inflammation that can erode cartilage and occasionally underlying bone, resulting in damaged and deformed joints.

. Osteonecrosis. If there isn’t enough blood supplied to the ball portion of the hip joint, such as might result from a dislocation or fracture, the bone might collapse and deform.

Signs that you may need a Hip Replacement

. Hip pain that prevents walking, bending, climbing stairs or doing daily chores.

. Pain in your hip even when not walking or standing.

. Stiffness in your hip that prevents lifting your leg.

. Failure of non-surgical treatments to provide relief.

. Depression or other changes in your mental health.

. Your doctor rules out other health problems.

Who are good candidates for Hip Replacement?

The most likely candidates for hip replacement include:

. People who experience pain that disrupts regular activities.

. People with osteoarthritis or hip injuries.

. People with rheumatoid arthritis, osteonecrosis or bone tumors may need hip replacements to relieve pain.

. People also receive hip replacements to increase mobility and improve overall quality of life.

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Preparing for hip replacement

. Your surgeon will explain how to get ready for your operation. If you smoke, you’ll need to stop. Smoking makes it more likely you’ll get a chest or wound infection after surgery. This can slow down your recovery.

. If you’re overweight, it’s a good idea to try to lose weight. It may help to reduce the strain on your hip joint and reduce your risk of complications after surgery. Stay as active as you can and keep doing any exercises recommended by your doctor or physiotherapist.

. Your surgeon will make sure you’re well enough to have the operation. You may need to have some blood and urine tests, X-ray images of your hip, and an electrocardiogram (ECG) to check your heart is healthy.

. If you haven’t been to the dentist for a while, book a check-up. A dental infection may make you more likely to get an infection in your joint if bacteria from your teeth get into your bloodstream. If you take certain medicines, you may need to stop these about four weeks before your operation. Your surgeon will discuss this with you.

. Your surgeon may recommend that you see an occupational therapist before your hip replacement. Buying some special equipment or making changes at home may mean you can move around more easily after surgery.

. Your operation can be done under spinal or epidural anaesthesia. This completely blocks feeling from below your waist, but you’ll stay awake during the operation. Or you may be able to have the operation under general anaesthesia, which means you’ll be asleep during the operation. Your surgeon will let you know which type of anaesthesia is best for you.

. If you have a general anaesthetic, you’ll be asked to follow fasting instructions. This means not eating or drinking anything for a specific number of hours before your operation. It’s important to follow your anaesthetist’s advice.

. Your surgeon will discuss with you what will happen before, during and after your surgery. If you’re unsure about anything, don’t be afraid to ask. No question is too small. It’s important that you feel fully informed so you feel happy to give your consent for the operation to go ahead. You’ll also be asked to sign a consent form.

. Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant.

. Tell your healthcare provider if you are sensitive to or are allergic to any medicines, latex, tape, and anesthesia (both local and general).

. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you are taking. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, and herbal supplements.

. Tell your healthcare provider if you have a history of bleeding disorders or if you are taking any blood-thinners (anticoagulants), aspirin, or other medicines that affect blood clotting. You may need to stop taking these medicines before the surgery.

. Do conditioning exercises as prescribed to strengthen muscles.

. Arrange for someone to help around the house for a week or two after you are discharged from the hospital.

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Side effects and Complications

Side effects of hip replacement

After hip replacement surgery, you may have some temporary side-effects. These include:

. A sore hip and leg for a few weeks

. Swelling in your leg – this might last for several weeks

. Constipation

However, if the pain and swelling in your hip or leg gets worse, seek medical help as this may be a sign of a blood clot in your leg.

Complications of hip replacement

Most people don’t get serious complications after hip replacement surgery. But possible complications include the following.

. Joint dislocation. This is when the ball part comes out of the socket because your muscles haven’t fully healed. If this happens, it’s usually in the first three months after your surgery and you may need another operation to treat it.

. A blood clot. This is usually in a vein in your leg (deep vein thrombosis).

. An infection. Your surgeon may prescribe antibiotics during and after surgery to help prevent this.

. Difference in leg length. One leg may be slightly longer than the other after surgery – you can correct this by wearing a shoe insert on the shorter side.

. Hip fracture. You can get tiny cracks in your bone while your surgeon’s fitting the new joint. These may heal, but it’s possible that you’ll need to have another operation.

. Loosening of your hip joint. You may need another operation to fix this.

. Bleeding under your skin, causing a swelling called a haematoma. This may clear up on its own or you may need a smaller operation to remove the blood.

. Nerve damage. It’s possible that nerves in your leg and bottom can be damaged during the operation.

. Urine (wee) infections or difficulty weeing.

. Particles of metal getting into your bloodstream from the metal parts.

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During Hip Replacement

Types of Hip Replacement Surgery

Surgeons perform hip replacements by using a posterior approach or an anterior approach. With a posterior hip replacement, the incision is made at the side or back of the hip. During anterior hip replacement, the surgeon makes the incision at the front of the hip.

The posterior approach is more common in part because it allows better visibility of the hip joint, though the anterior approach is becoming more prevalent. There is no significant difference between the procedures as far as recovery from surgery, but the anterior procedure may pose a higher risk of nerve damage that could cause numbness in the outer thigh.

Patients who are younger than 50, have a normal body mass index or who are in overall good health may be candidates for minimally-invasive surgery. During this surgery, the incision is smaller and recovery time after the surgery is shorter.

Special bone cement is commonly used to hold hip implants in place, but some surgeons use a cementless fixation technique. Devices that do not require cement have a textured surface that allows the bone to grow onto the implant and secure it. A hybrid total hip replacement involves implanting the cup without cement and setting the ball in place with cement.

. Total Hip Replacement

Total hip replacement is the most common hip surgery. It uses artificial components to replace the entire hip structure. During the procedure, surgeons insert a stem into the patient’s femur, or thighbone, for stability. They replace the head of the femur with a ball and replace the natural socket in the hip joint with an artificial cup.

. Partial Hip Replacement

Partial hip replacement removes and replaces the patient’s femoral head, which is the ball at the top of the femur, or thighbone. It does not replace the socket. A ceramic or metal ball is attached to the top of a stem that’s inserted into the hollow center of the femur. Surgeons typically perform this surgery to repair certain types of hip fractures.

. Hip Resurfacing

Hip resurfacing helps relieve pain from cartilage loss. A surgeon trims damage from the natural bone ball at the top of the thighbone. He or she then resurfaces it with a smooth metal covering. The surgeon also lines the natural bone socket of the hip with a metal lining or shell.

Bilateral Hip Replacement vs. Staged Hip Replacements

If both hips require replacement, surgeons may choose a staged hip replacement. They replace one hip at a time, letting the patient recover from the first surgery before doing the second one. Alternatively, the patient may undergo a bilateral hip replacement in which both hips are replaced at the same time.

A bilateral hip replacement can mean a single trip to the operating room and the potential for less overall recovery time. But it doesn’t work for all patients.

The risk of blood loss during surgery is greater with bilateral hip replacement and patients are under anesthesia for twice as long — up to four hours. Patients are also more likely to require longer hospitalization or inpatient rehab.

Bilateral replacements usually involve younger, healthy and active patients who can handle more rigorous physical therapy and exercise following hip replacements.

Types of Implants

Device manufacturers design hip implants to mimic the natural movement of the body. The primary differences between implants are their size and the material of the components.

Hip implant components are made of polyethylene (plastic), metal, ceramic or a combination of the materials.

. Metal-on-Polyethylene (MoP)

One of the most common types of hip implant, metal-on-polyethylene has been used since the 1960s. The ball is made of metal and the socket has a plastic lining or is made entirely of polyethylene. Plastic has a smooth surface that causes little friction while the ball moves within the socket. However, MoP implants can produce plastic debris, which can eventually cause the implant to fail. Wear debris from the breakdown of materials could lead to a condition called osteolysis, which occurs when inflammation destroys the bone and the implant in the bone loosens.

. Metal-on-Metal (MoM)

Metal-on-metal hip devices are no longer available in the United States, though thousands of people may have been implanted with them. Around the turn of the century, many new hip implants were made from metal-on-metal components, meaning the ball, stem and socket were all made out of metal. Manufacturers believed the metals were more durable than other materials. However, MoM hip implants can shed metal particles that may cause a number of serious health issues, including a type of metal poisoning called metallosis. Several models of metal-on-metal hips were recalled or taken off the market.

. Ceramic-on-Polyethylene (CoP)

Ceramic-on-polyethylene devices couple a ceramic ball with a socket made from plastic. They may also substitute the plastic socket for a polyethylene lining in the natural socket. With plastic parts, there is still a risk of wear that causes debris that leads to osteolysis.

. Ceramic-on-Ceramic (CoC)

Ceramic-on-ceramic devices combine a ceramic head with a ceramic lining in the hip socket.

. Ceramic-on-Metal (CoM)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first ceramic-on-metal hip device in 2011, making the design relatively new. The ball is made of ceramic and the socket has a metal lining.

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Alternatives to Hip Replacement

Most doctors will ask patients to consider alternative methods for relieving pain or increasing mobility before recommending an artificial hip implant.

One such option called sub-chondroplasty attempts to promote natural bone growth to repair damaged hips. Doctors inject a bone substitute into the hip joint. The material fills gaps, voids and lesions in the bone. Over time, the body begins replacing the material with natural bone, which can sometimes lead to permanent repairs.

Alternative treatments usually tried before hip replacement include:

. Exercises that increase muscle around the hip

. Canes, walkers and other walking aids

. Over-the-counter medication for pain without inflammation

. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain with inflammation

. Osteotomy of the femur, a procedure that involves cutting and realigning the bone

But when alternative treatments do not provide relief, increase mobility or improve quality of life, doctors may consider a hip replacement procedure. They will analyze the patient’s medical history, take X-rays and perform physical exams to test hip mobility and strength. They may also conduct MRIs or CT scans.

After Hip Replacement

What to expect afterwards

After surgery, you may feel some discomfort or pain as the anaesthetic wears off. You’ll be offered pain relief if and when you need it. You may not be able to feel or move your legs for several hours after a spinal or epidural anaesthetic.

A nurse may have to put a pad or pillow between your legs to hold your legs apart and keep your hip joint in one position. This will stop your hip from dislocating (moving out of position).

A physiotherapist will usually visit you after your operation and will see you regularly afterwards. They’ll give you some exercises to do. It’s important to do these as often as they tell you to. The exercises are designed to help you get moving again and strengthen your hip.

You may feel a bit constipated after surgery. Some people don’t pass stools for two to four days after a hip replacement. To prevent constipation, eat plenty of fruits and vegetables and drink plenty of fluids (up to two litres a day). If your constipation doesn’t get better, your doctor may prescribe a short course of laxative medicines.

You may need to wear compression stockings during and after the operation. This will help to prevent blood clots forming in the veins in your legs (deep vein thrombosis). You may need to have an injection of an anti-clotting medicine (or tablets) as well as or instead of wearing compression stockings.

You’ll need to stay in hospital until you’re able to cope on your own at home. This is usually for four to eight days but it may be sooner if you’re recovering well. When you’re ready to go home, ask someone you know to drive you. Your nurse will give you some advice about caring for your hip and a date for a follow-up appointment. This is usually about eight weeks after your operation.

You’ll have a scar on your hip and thigh. If your surgeon used staples or stitches, you’ll usually need to keep your wound covered until these are removed. A district nurse will help you change your bandages and remove your stitches after 10 days. If you have dissolvable stitches, they won’t need to be removed. Ask your surgical team for advice on keeping your wound covered and when you can have a shower or bath.

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Recovering from hip replacement

Everyone recovers differently from hip replacement surgery. How quickly you recover may depend on your age, your general health, the type of surgery you have and if you have any complications. When you leave hospital, your recovery will carry on at home. It’s important to build up slowly, doing a little bit more exercise each day. By around six weeks, you may be able to return to work but this will depend on what sort of job you do.

. Short-term recovery

You’ll probably feel the benefits of the operation almost straight away, but you may feel some pain for a few weeks. You’ll usually be prescribed painkillers to take home when you leave hospital. If you need more pain relief, you may be able to take over-the-counter painkillers, such as paracetamol. But ask your doctor or nurse for advice first. Always read the patient information leaflet that comes with your medicine and, if you have any questions about your medicines, ask your pharmacist.

After your operation, your body uses up extra energy to help your wound heal. For the first couple of weeks, you may feel more tired than usual, so remember to rest when you need to. If you lost a lot of blood during surgery, you may be recommended to take iron supplements. You won’t be able to return to work or drive for a while after your operation – usually for around six weeks, sometimes longer.

Your leg may be a bit swollen and ache at first. But getting up and moving after your operation is important. Ideally, you shouldn’t sit down for long periods of time. At first, you’ll need support and supervision, but it’ll gradually get easier. However, if the pain and swelling in your hip or leg gets worse, seek medical help as this may be a sign of a blood clot in your leg.

. Long-term recovery

The exercises recommended by your physiotherapist are a crucial part of your recovery, so it’s important to keep doing them once you’re back at home.

Your surgeon or physiotherapist may also give you advice on what you should and shouldn’t do in the first six weeks to protect your hip. For example, try to avoid:

. Crossing your legs

. Twisting your hip inwards and outwards

. Bending your hips past 90 degrees (a right angle)

. Sitting on very low chairs or toilet seats – raise them where possible

. Bending over from your hips to reach objects on the floor or tie shoelaces

. Cutting or painting your toenails

. Lying on your side for the first six weeks after your surgery – if you do, put a pillow between your legs.

You should be able to move around your home and manage stairs, but you may find things like shopping difficult for a few weeks. Ask friends and family to help out or order your shopping online. Don’t be afraid or embarrassed to ask for help. Make sure you can move around safely at home – watch out for rugs and trailing wires.

After a couple of weeks, you should be able to walk longer distances and for longer periods of time with less support. But some people need to use walking sticks or crutches for around four to six weeks.

Try to sleep on your back for the first six weeks. Put a pillow between your knees to keep your hip in the right position. Most people can have sex after six to eight weeks but avoid any positions that put too much pressure on your hip joint.

If you work, you can usually go back after about six weeks. But if your work involves a lot of walking, standing or lifting, you may need to stay off for longer – sometimes for up to three months. Speak to your occupational health advisor, as you may be able to change the type of work you do until you’ve fully recovered.

You should be able to drive again after about six weeks but check with your surgeon and car insurer. You shouldn’t drive if you’re in a lot of pain or you’re still taking any medicines (including painkillers) that can make you drowsy. Even getting in and out of a car as a passenger for the first three weeks may put too much strain on your hip. Try to avoid travelling in a car unless it is essential.

By six to eight weeks, you should be able to take a short flight (internal or European). It’s best to hold off on any long-haul travel until around 12 weeks, and always check with your doctor and travel insurer before you go.

By around six to eight weeks, you should be able to walk and swim. But it will take you longer to get back to sports such as tennis or golf.

How can I make my recovery easier?

It’s important that you’re as fit and healthy as possible before your hip replacement. If you’re overweight or obese, this can increase your risk of complications after surgery. So, losing some weight before your operation may help your recovery. Smoking makes you more likely to get infections after surgery. This can slow down your recovery, so it’s a good idea to give up beforehand.

It’s also a good idea to exercise to prepare your upper body for using crutches. And try to strengthen your leg muscles too. Ask your surgeon or physiotherapist for advice on the type of exercises to do.

Try to get your home ready for when you come back from hospital. You may need to rearrange your furniture to make it easier to move around safely. You’ll need to make sure you’ll be able to wash and dress yourself, and to cook easily after your surgery.

You may need to make your bed, chairs and toilet seats higher so you don’t strain your hip when you sit down. An occupational therapist will have lots of advice on getting your home ready, and on borrowing or buying the equipment you’ll need. Stock up on frozen or tinned food too so you don’t need to go shopping immediately after your surgery. Or do an online shop to be delivered when you get home.

If possible, ask friends or family to stay with you for a couple of weeks after the operation to help you while you recover.

Are there any sports I shouldn’t do?

Many people return to sporting activity after their hip replacement. But speak to your surgeon before your operation about the types of sports you do and the impact they will have on your new joint replacement.

Hold off on high-impact sports that put a lot of pressure on your hips, such as cycling and tennis, until you’ve fully healed.

As you recover from your operation, you can start swimming. But your surgeon may tell you to avoid doing breaststroke as the sideways kicking may dislocate your hip. It’s a good idea to go for extra walks to strengthen your muscles around the joint. You may be able to use an exercise bike, but check with your surgeon or physiotherapist first. Cycling may be difficult for the first 12 weeks because it may be difficult to get on and off the bike.

Once you’ve made a full recovery, you can have a more active lifestyle. But try not to run on hard surfaces at first, so avoid sports such as squash and tennis. And don’t do sports with a high risk of falling, such as skiing.

Hip Replacement Cost

The cost of a hip replacement surgery varies depending upon where it is performed and the type of surgery. The cost of hip replacement surgery in Iran starts from $1750.

Overall hip replacement surgery cost in Iran vs. other countries

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in the USA

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 210 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in the USA.

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in the UK

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 250 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in the UK.

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in India

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 70 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in India.

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in Mexico

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 120 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Mexico.

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in Canada

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 320 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Canada.

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in Australia

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 280 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Australia.

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in Turkey

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 90 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Turkey.

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in Russia

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 360 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Russia.

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in France

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 320 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in France.

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in Singapore

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 170 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Singapore.

Hip replacement Surgery cost in Iran vs. hip replacement Surgery cost in Pakistan

The average cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Iran is 140 percent less than the cost of Hip replacement Surgery in Pakistan.

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16 Responses

  1. I don’t know anything about how to search for a spectalist;How do I choose a doctor for hip replacement?
    nately 57

    1. Take time to research the doctors’ credentials and experience. Look for a doctor who is board certified in orthopedic surgery and performs hip replacement on a regular basis. The more experience a doctor has treating your condition and performing hip replacement, the better your results are likely to be.

    1. Call your surgeon right away; he or she may want to see the wound or prescribe an ointment. If an infection starts, it will delay your surgery by at least one week

    1. Everyone heals from surgery at a different pace. It is difficult to compare yourself with others, as individual situations lead some patients to recovery faster than other; however, in general, patients will use a walker or crutches while in the hospital. These devices are typically for balance, and patients may weight-bear as their comfort allows. It is our experience that as patients comfort, confidence, and strength allows, they may progress to a cane. Similarly, when patient’s comfort, confidence and strength allows, they progress off of the cane. Typically, patients may progress to a cane at 2-3 weeks. By 4-6 weeks’ time, many patients are not requiring any external supports. It may take up to 3 months to return to normal function and patients continue to improve, as far as their comfort, mobility, and function for up to a year after their surgery.

    1. After hip replacement surgery in iran, you will notice discolored skin, some swelling and drainage around your incision. This is normal. If you experience painful redness, abnormal swelling or thick, bad-smelling drainage from your incision, you might have an infection. A temperature over 101°F also could indicate an infection

    1. the feeling of tiredness (fatigue) after surgery is normal for most patients and there are some reasons for this.

    1. Most hip replacement patients can do most of their daily activities at the end of six week after surgery.
      At the end of the third month after surgery, the vast majority of patients gain muscle strength and functional ability that they have lost before and during surgery and can perform daily activities without restriction.
      After starting daily activities, the patient should be careful to avoid prolonged prosthetic activities that impose tremendous pressure on the joint.

    1. Most hip replacement patients can do most of their daily activities at the end of six week after surgery.
      At the end of the third month after surgery, the vast majority of patients gain muscle strength and functional ability that they have lost before and during surgery and can perform daily activities without restriction.
      After starting daily activities, the patient should be careful to avoid prolonged prosthetic activities that impose tremendous pressure on the joint.

    1. There is no Chinese prosthesis in the market. The best synthetic prosthetic material that has a durability and longevity is American prosthesis. These prostheses, as the manufacturers themselves have stated, are about 25 to 30 years old.

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