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Herniated disk treatment in Iran

Herniated disk treatment IN IRAN

Herniated disk treatment in Iran

Disk herniation treatment in Iran

Overview

A herniated disk in Iran refers to a problem with one of the rubbery cushions (disks) between the individual bones (vertebrae) that stack up to make your spine.

A spinal disk is a little like a jelly donut, with a softer center encased within a tougher exterior. Sometimes called a slipped disk or a ruptured disk, a herniated disk occurs when some of the softer "jelly" pushes out through a tear in the tougher exterior.

A herniated disk can press on the nerves in your spine and cause pain, weakness, and numbness in your neck, back, arms, and legs. Sometimes these symptoms can be severe enough to disrupt your life.

Causes

Disk herniation is most often the result of a gradual, aging-related wear and tear called disk degeneration. As you age, your spinal disks lose some of their water content. That makes them less flexible and more prone to tearing or rupturing with even a minor strain or twist.

Most people can't pinpoint the exact cause of their herniated disk. Sometimes, using your back muscles instead of your leg and thigh muscles to lift large, heavy objects can lead to a herniated disk, as can twisting and turning while lifting. Rarely, a traumatic event such as a fall or a blow to the back can cause a herniated disk.

Certain individuals may be more vulnerable to disc problems and, as a result, may suffer herniated discs in several places along the spine. Research has shown that a predisposition for herniated discs may exist in families with several members affected.

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Symptoms

Most herniated disks occur in your lower back (lumbar spine), although they can also occur in your neck (cervical spine). The most common signs and symptoms of a herniated disk are:

Arm or leg pain. If your herniated disk is in your lower back, you'll typically feel the most intense pain in your buttocks, thigh and calf. It may also involve part of the foot. If your herniated disk is in your neck, the pain will typically be most intense in the shoulder and arm. This pain may shoot into your arm or leg when you cough, sneeze or move your spine into certain positions.

Numbness or tingling. People who have a herniated disk often experience numbness or tingling in the body part served by the affected nerves.

Weakness. Muscles served by the affected nerves tend to weaken. This may cause you to stumble, or impair your ability to lift or hold items.

You also can have a herniated disk without knowing it — herniated disks sometimes show up on spinal images of people who have no symptoms of a disk problem.

Herniated disk treatment in IranRisk factors

Factors increasing your risk of a herniated disk may include:

. Weight. Excess body weight causes extra stress on the disks in your lower back.

. Occupation. People with physically demanding jobs have a greater risk of back problems. Repetitive lifting, pulling, pushing, bending sideways and twisting also may increase your risk of a herniated disk.

. Genetics. Some people inherit a predisposition to developing a herniated disk.

. Unsafe lifting technique. People should always apply force from the legs, not the back, when lifting heavy items. Incorrect technique can lead to a herniated disk.

. Driving often. A combination of being seated for long periods and the vibrations and movements of the car can damage the disks and spinal structure.

. Sedentary lifestyle. A lack of exercise can lead to a herniated disk.

. Smoking. This might reduce oxygen supply to the disks and lead to a grinding-down of the tissue.

Complications

Your spinal cord doesn't extend into the lower portion of your spinal canal. Just below your waist, the spinal cord separates into a group of long nerve roots (cauda equina) that resemble a horse's tail. Rarely, disk herniation can compress the entire cauda equina. Emergency surgery may be required to avoid permanent weakness or paralysis.

Seek emergency medical attention if you have:

Worsening symptoms. Pain, numbness or weakness may increase to the point that you can't perform your usual daily activities.

Bladder or bowel dysfunction. People who have cauda equina syndrome may become incontinent or have difficulty urinating even with a full bladder.

Saddle anesthesia. This progressive loss of sensation affects the areas that would touch a saddle — the inner thighs, back of legs and the area around the rectum.

Herniated disk treatment in IranPreventive measures

To help prevent a herniated disk:

. Exercise. Strengthening the trunk muscles helps stabilize and support the spine.

. Maintain good posture. Good posture reduces the pressure on your spine and disks. Keep your back straight and aligned, particularly when sitting for long periods. Lift heavy objects properly, making your legs — not your back — do most of the work.

. Maintain a healthy weight. Excess weight puts more pressure on the spine and disks, making them more susceptible to herniation.

Diagnosis

During the physical exam, your doctor will check your back for tenderness. He or she may ask you to lie flat and move your legs into various positions to help determine the cause of your pain. Your doctor may also perform a neurological exam, to check your:

. Reflexes

. Muscle strength

. Walking ability

. Ability to feel light touches, pinpricks or vibration

In most cases of herniated disk, a physical exam and a medical history are all that's needed to make a diagnosis. If your doctor suspects another condition or needs to see which nerves are affected, he or she may order one or more of the following tests.

Imaging tests

. X-rays. Plain X-rays don't detect herniated disks, but they may be performed to rule out other causes of back pain, such as an infection, tumor, spinal alignment issues or a broken bone.

. Computerized tomography (CT scan). A CT scanner takes a series of X-rays from many different directions and then combines them to create cross-sectional images of your spinal column and the structures around it.

. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Radio waves and a strong magnetic field are used to create images of your body's internal structures. This test can be used to confirm the location of the herniated disk and to see which nerves are affected.

. Myelogram. A dye is injected into the spinal fluid, and then X-rays are taken. This test can show pressure on your spinal cord or nerves due to multiple herniated disks or other conditions.

Nerve tests

Electromyograms and nerve conduction studies measure how well electrical impulses are moving along nerve tissue. This can help pinpoint the location of the nerve damage.

Herniated disk treatment in Iran

Treatment

Non-Surgical Treatments

The initial treatment for a herniated disc is usually conservative and nonsurgical. A doctor may advise the patient to maintain a low, painless activity level for a few days to several weeks. This helps the spinal nerve inflammation to decrease. Bedrest is not recommended.

A herniated disc is frequently treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, if the pain is only mild to moderate. An epidural steroid injection may be performed utilizing a spinal needle under X-ray guidance to direct the medication to the exact level of the disc herniation.

The doctor may recommend physical therapy. The therapist will perform an in-depth evaluation, which, combined with the doctor's diagnosis, dictates a treatment specifically designed for patients with herniated discs. Therapy may include pelvic traction, gentle massage, ice and heat therapy, ultrasound, electrical muscle stimulation and stretching exercises. Pain medication and muscle relaxants may also be beneficial in conjunction with physical therapy.

Surgery

Most people with a herniated disk don't need surgery. Rest and other treatments should start to improve your symptoms within 4 to 6 weeks. But if your pain doesn’t improve, surgery might be an option.

Talk to your doctor about surgery if:

. You’re not getting relief from pain relievers, injections, and physical therapy.

. Your symptoms keep getting worse.

. You have trouble standing or walking.

. You can't control your bowels or bladder.

Diskectomy

. During this procedure, your surgeon removes your damaged disk to relieve pressure on your nerves. He can perform the surgery in a couple of ways:

. Your surgeons performs open diskectomy is via a cut in your back or neck.

. Microdiscectomy is done through a much smaller incision. Your surgeon inserts a thin tube with a camera on one end to see and remove the damaged disk.

Lumbar laminotomy. Sometimes your surgeon will also need to remove a small piece of bone called the lamina from the vertebra. The lamina forms a protective cover over your spinal cord. Removing part or all of it helps the surgeon access your herniated disk. It also can relieve pressure on your nerves and eliminate leg pain and sciatica.

The lamina can be removed during the diskectomy. Or, you might have it taken out in a separate surgery.

Spinal fusion. After a diskectomy or laminotomy, your surgeon may fuse together the two vertebrae on either side of the disk to stabilize your spine. This is called spinal fusion. Fusing the two disks will stop the bones from moving and prevent you from having any more pain.

Artificial disk surgery. Only a few people are good candidates for artificial disk surgery because it only works on certain disks in your lower back. But if your doctor thinks this is an option, he will replace your damaged disk with one made of plastic or metal. The new disk will help keep your spine stable and let you move more easily.

 

10 common question about Herniated disk treatment

1Can herniated discs heal on their own?
Usually a herniated disc will heal on its own over time. Be patient, and keep following your treatment plan. If your symptoms don't get better in a few months, you may want to talk to your doctor about surgery.
2How do you relieve herniated disc pain?
Lifestyle and home remedies Take pain relievers. Over-the-counter medications — such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen (Aleve, others) — may help reduce the pain associated with a herniated disk. Use heat or cold. ... Avoid too much bed rest.
3How long does it take to recover from a herniated disc?
Self care: In most cases, the pain from a herniated disc will get better within a couple days and completely resolve in 4 to 6 weeks. Restricting your activity, ice/heat therapy, and taking over the counter medications will help your recovery.
4What happens if a herniated disc goes untreated?
An untreated, severe slipped disc can lead to permanent nerve damage. In very rare cases, a slipped disc can cut off nerve impulses to the cauda equina nerves in your lower back and legs. If this occurs, you may lose bowel or bladder control. Another long-term complication is known as saddle anesthesia.
5Is walking good for herniated disc?
What Kind of Exercise to Do When You Have a Herniated Disc. You don't need to endure an intense cardio program or lift heavy weights—simple stretching and aerobic exercises can effectively control your herniated disc pain. ... Moderate aerobic activities, including walking, biking, and swimming, also help relieve pain.
6Can I make a herniated disc worse?
The pain from a herniated disc usually is worse when you are active and gets better when you are resting. Coughing, sneezing, sitting, driving, and bending forward may make the pain worse. The pain gets worse when you make these movements because there is more pressure on the nerve.
7Is a herniated disc serious?
A herniated disk is a common condition that can be painful and debilitating. People also refer to it as a slipped disk or disk prolapse. In some cases, it can lead to pain, numbness, or weakness in the limbs. However, some people experience no pain, particularly if the disk does not press on any nerves.
8Is sitting bad for a herniated disc?
The dangers of poor sitting posture In turn, this can overstretch your spinal ligaments and strain your herniated disc. ... Keep your knees at the same level as your hips—or sit with your knees slightly above your hips if you are sitting at a desk. Keep your feet flat on the floor.
9Do you ever fully recover from a herniated disc?
Surgery often can resolve herniated disk symptoms more quickly than other treatments. In general, though, when there is no nerve damage, the long-term outcome for surgical and non-surgical treatment is the same when measured two years after symptoms begin. ... Back symptoms usually go away on their own.
10Should I have surgery for herniated disc?
Treatment. Fortunately, the majority of herniated discs do not require surgery. However, a very small percentage of people with herniated, degenerated discs may experience symptomatic or severe and incapacitating low back pain, which significantly affects daily life. ... The doctor may recommend physical therapy.

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