Breast Infection

Breast Infection

How the Breast Is Built

The breast is composed of several glands and ducts that lead to the nipple and the surrounding colored area called the areola. The milk-carrying ducts extend from the nipple into the underlying breasttissue like the spokes of a wheel. Under the areola are lactiferous ducts. These fill with milk during lactation after a woman has a baby. When a girl reaches puberty, changing hormones cause the ducts to grow and cause fat deposits in the breast tissue to increase. The glands that produce milk (mammary glands) that are connected to the surface of the breast by the lactiferous ducts may extend to the armpit area.

Breast Infection Causes

Mastitis is an infection of the tissue of the breast that occurs most frequently during the time of breastfeeding. It can occur when bacteria, often from the baby's mouth, enter a milk duct through a crack in the nipple.

Breast infections most commonly occur one to three months after the delivery of a baby, but they can occur in women who have not recently delivered and in women after menopause. Other causes of infection include chronic mastitis and a rare form of cancer called inflammatory carcinoma.

iranian surgery

In healthy women, mastitis is rare. However, women with diabetes, chronic illness, AIDS, or an impaired immune system may be more susceptible.

About 1%-3% of breastfeeding mothers develop mastitis. Engorgement and incomplete breast emptying can contribute to the problem and make the symptoms worse.

Chronic mastitis occurs in women who are not breastfeeding. In postmenopausal women, breast infections may be associated with chronic inflammation of the ducts below the nipple. Hormonal changes in the body can cause the milk ducts to become clogged with dead skin cells and debris. These clogged ducts make the breast more open to bacterial infection. Infection tends to come back after treatment with antibiotics.

Breast infections may cause pain, redness, and warmth of the breast along with the following symptoms:

  • Tenderness and swelling
  • Body aches
  • Fatigue
  • Breast engorgement
  • Fever and chills
  • Abscess: A breast abscess can be a complication of mastitis. Noncancerous masses such as abscesses are more often tender and frequently feel mobile beneath the skin. The edge of the mass is usually regular and well defined. Indications that this more serious infection has occurred include the following:
    • Tender lump in the breast that does not get smaller after breastfeeding a newborn (If the abscess is deep in the breast, you may not be able to feel it.)
    • Pus draining from the nipple
    • Persistent fever and no improvement of symptoms within 48-72 hours of treatment

10 common question about braest infection

1What causes breast infection?
Breast infections are usually caused by common bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) found on normal skin. The bacteria enter through a break or crack in the skin, usually on the nipple. The infection takes place in the fatty tissue of the breast and causes swelling. This swelling pushes on the milk ducts.
2Can you get a breast infection when not breastfeeding?
Chronic mastitis occurs in women who are not breastfeeding. In postmenopausal women, breast infections may be associated with chronic inflammation of the ducts below the nipple. Hormonal changes in the body can cause the milk ducts to become clogged with dead skin cells and debris.
3What is the best antibiotic for a breast infection?
What Is the Treatment for Breast Infection? Breast infections require treatment by a health care provider. For simple mastitis without an abscess, oral antibiotics are prescribed. Cephalexin (Keflex) and dicloxacillin (Dycill) are two of the most common antibiotics chosen, but a number of others are available.
4What does breast infection look like?
Symptoms. Symptoms of breast infection can include a fever, flu-like symptoms, and nausea. In some cases, a person with a breast infection may notice an infected lesion on the surface of the breast. Other times, pain deep in the breast might indicate an infection.
5How do I know if I have an infection in my breast?
Symptoms of a breast infection can start suddenly and may include: abnormal swelling, leading to one breast becoming larger than the other. breast tenderness. pain or burning while breastfeeding. a painful lump in the breast. itching. warm breast. chills. nipple discharge that contains pus.
6What causes pus in breast?
A breast abscess is a painful collection of pus that forms in the breast. Most abscesses develop just under the skin and are caused by a bacterial infection. Breast abscesses are painful, swollen lumps that may also: ... cause the surrounding skin to swell.
7What are the first signs of mastitis?
Mastitis Symptoms Tender, swollen breasts. The presence of one or more lumps in the breast. Breasts that are warm or hot to the touch. Breast pain or burning either during or while not breastfeeding. Red skin, sometimes in a wedge-shaped pattern. Flu-like symptoms, such as chills or fatigue. Fever of 101℉ (38.3℃) or greater.
8What does it mean when you have a discharge from your breast?
Nipple discharge that contains pus may indicate an infection in your breast. ... If you have an infection or abscess in your breast, you may also notice that your breast is sore, red, or warm to the touch. Mammary duct ectasia. This is the second most common cause of abnormal nipple discharge.
9Can a breast abscess be cancer?
The association of breast cancer and abscess is known, but this malignant inflammatory disease is rare in daily practice.
10Can breast abscess heal on its own?
You can usually go home the same day and may be given antibiotics to take at home. The abscess should heal completely in a few days or weeks. Continue feeding with both breasts if you can. This won't harm your baby and can help your breast heal.

[kkstarratings]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

قبول المرضي خلال الکورونا