Spinal Tumor surgery

 Spinal Tumor surgery

Spinal Cord Tumor

What is Spinal Cord Tumor?

A spinal tumor is a growth that develops within your spinal canal or within the bones of your spine. A spinal cord tumor, also called an intradural tumor, is a spinal tumor that that begins within the spinal cord or the covering of the spinal cord (dura). A tumor that affects the bones of the spine (vertebrae) is called a vertebral tumor.

Spinal cord tumors may be classified as one of three different types depending on where they occur relative to the protective membranes of the spinal cord.

These are the main types of intradural tumors:

. Intramedullary tumors begin in the cells within the spinal cord itself, such as gliomas, astrocytomas or ependymomas.

. Extramedullary tumors grow in either the membrane surrounding the spinal cord or the nerve roots that reach out from the spinal cord. Although they don't begin within the spinal cord itself, these types of tumors may affect spinal cord function by causing spinal cord compression and other problems. Examples of extramedullary tumors that can affect the spinal cord include meningiomas, neurofibromas, schwannomas and nerve sheath tumors.

Tumors from other parts of the body can spread (metastasize) to the vertebrae, the supporting network around the spinal cord or, in rare cases, the spinal cord itself.

Spinal tumors or growths of any kind can lead to pain, neurological problems and sometimes paralysis. A spinal tumor can be life-threatening and cause permanent disability.

Treatment for a spinal tumor may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy or other medications.

About Iranian Surgery

Iranian surgery is an online medical tourism platform where you can find the best surgeons in Iran. The price of treating a Spinal Cord Tumor in Iran can vary according to each individual’s case and will be determined by an in-person assessment with the doctor.

For more information about the cost of Spinal Cord Tumor Treatment in Iran and to schedule an appointment in advance, you can contact Iranian Surgery consultants via WhatsApp number 0098 901 929 0946. This service is completely free.

Before Spinal Cord Tumor Treatment

Symptoms

Spinal cord tumors can cause different signs and symptoms, especially as tumors grow. The tumors may affect your spinal cord or the nerve roots, blood vessels or bones of your spine. Signs and symptoms may include:

. Pain at the site of the tumor due to tumor growth

. Back pain, often radiating to other parts of your body

. Feeling less sensitive to pain, heat and cold

. Loss of bowel or bladder function

. Difficulty walking, sometimes leading to falls

. Back pain that's worse at night

. Loss of sensation or muscle weakness, especially in your arms or legs

. Muscle weakness, which may be mild or severe, in different parts of your body

Back pain is a common early symptom of spinal tumors. Pain may also spread beyond your back to your hips, legs, feet or arms and may worsen over time — even with treatment.

Spinal tumors progress at different rates depending on the type of tumor.

When to see a doctor

There are many causes of back pain, and most back pain isn't caused by a tumor. But because early diagnosis and treatment are important for spinal tumors, see your doctor about your back pain if:

. It's persistent and progressive

. It's not activity related

. It gets worse at night

. You have a history of cancer and develop new back pain

. You have other symptoms of cancer, such as nausea, vomiting or dizziness

Seek immediate medical attention if you experience:

. Progressive muscle weakness or numbness in your legs or arms

. Changes in bowel or bladder function

Causes

It's not clear why most spinal tumors develop. Experts suspect that defective genes play a role. But it's usually not known whether such genetic defects are inherited or simply develop over time. They might be caused by something in the environment, such as exposure to certain chemicals. In some cases, however, spinal cord tumors are linked to known inherited syndromes, such as neurofibromatosis 2 and von Hippel-Lindau disease.

Risk factors

Spinal cord tumors are more common in people who have:

. Neurofibromatosis 2. In this hereditary disorder, benign tumors develop on or near the nerves related to hearing. This may lead to progressive hearing loss in one or both ears. Some people with neurofibromatosis 2 also develop spinal canal tumors.

. Von Hippel-Lindau disease. This rare, multisystem disorder is associated with blood vessel tumors (hemangioblastomas) in the brain, retina and spinal cord and with other types of tumors in the kidneys or adrenal glands.

Complications

Spinal tumors can compress spinal nerves, leading to a loss of movement or sensation below the location of the tumor. This can sometimes cause changes in bowel and bladder function. Nerve damage may be permanent.

However, if caught early and treated aggressively, it may be possible to prevent further loss of function and regain nerve function. Depending on its location, a tumor that presses against the spinal cord itself may be life-threatening.

Diagnosis

Spinal tumors sometimes might be overlooked because they're not common and their symptoms resemble those of more common conditions. For that reason, it's especially important that your doctor know your complete medical history and perform both general physical and neurological exams.

If your doctor suspects a spinal tumor, these tests can help confirm the diagnosis and pinpoint the tumor's location:

. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI uses a powerful magnetic field and radio waves to produce accurate images of your spine, spinal cord and nerves. MRI is usually the preferred test to diagnose tumors of the spinal cord and surrounding tissues. A contrast agent that helps highlight certain tissues and structures may be injected into a vein in your hand or forearm during the test.

Some people may feel claustrophobic inside the MRI scanner or find the loud thumping sound it makes disturbing. But you're usually given earplugs to help with the noise, and some scanners are equipped with televisions or headphones. If you're very anxious, ask about a mild sedative to help calm you. In certain situations, a general anesthetic may be necessary.

. Computerized tomography (CT). This test uses a narrow beam of radiation to produce detailed images of your spine. Sometimes it's combined with an injected contrast dye to make abnormal changes in the spinal canal or spinal cord easier to see. A CT scan is only rarely used to help diagnose spinal tumors.

. Biopsy. The only way to determine the exact type of a spinal tumor is to examine a small tissue sample (biopsy) under a microscope. The biopsy results will help determine treatment options.

During Spinal Cord Tumor Treatment

Treatment

Ideally, the goal of spinal tumor treatment is to eliminate the tumor completely, but this goal may be complicated by the risk of permanent damage to the spinal cord and surrounding nerves. Doctors also must take into account your age and overall health. The type of tumor and whether it arises from the structures of the spine or spinal canal or has spread to your spine from elsewhere in your body also must be considered in determining a treatment plan.

Treatment options for most spinal tumors include:

. Monitoring. Some spinal tumors may be discovered before they cause symptoms — often when you're being evaluated for another condition. If small tumors aren't growing or pressing on surrounding tissues, watching them carefully may be all that's needed.

During observation, your doctor will likely recommend periodic CT or MRI scans at an appropriate interval to monitor the tumor.

. Surgery. This is often the treatment of choice for tumors that can be removed with an acceptable risk of spinal cord or nerve injury damage.

Newer techniques and instruments allow neurosurgeons to reach tumors that were once considered inaccessible. The high-powered microscopes used in microsurgery make it easier to distinguish tumor from healthy tissue.

Doctors also can monitor the function of the spinal cord and other important nerves during surgery, thus minimizing the chance of injuring them. In some instances, very high-frequency sound waves might be used during surgery to break up tumors and remove the fragments.

But even with the latest technological advances in surgery, not all tumors can be totally removed. When the tumor can't be removed completely, surgery may be followed by radiation therapy or chemotherapy or both.

Recovery from spinal surgery may take weeks or longer, depending on the procedure. You may experience a temporary loss of sensation or other complications, including bleeding and damage to nerve tissue.

. Radiation therapy. This may be used to eliminate the remnants of tumors that remain after surgery, to treat inoperable tumors or to treat those tumors where surgery is too risky.

Medications may help ease some of the side effects of radiation, such as nausea and vomiting.

Sometimes, your radiation therapy regimen may be adjusted to help minimize the amount of healthy tissue that's damaged and to make the treatment more effective. Modifications may range from simply changing the dosage of radiation to using sophisticated techniques such as 3-D conformal radiation therapy.

. Chemotherapy. A standard treatment for many types of cancer, chemotherapy uses medications to destroy cancer cells or stop them from growing. Your doctor can determine whether chemotherapy might be beneficial for you, either alone or in combination with radiation therapy.

Side effects may include fatigue, nausea, vomiting, increased risk of infection and hair loss.

. Other drugs. Because surgery and radiation therapy as well as tumors themselves can cause inflammation inside the spinal cord, doctors sometimes prescribe corticosteroids to reduce the swelling, either after surgery or during radiation treatments.

Although corticosteroids reduce inflammation, they are usually used only for short periods to avoid serious side effects such as muscle weakness, osteoporosis, high blood pressure, diabetes and an increased susceptibility to infection.

Alternative medicine

Although there aren't any alternative medicines that have been proved to cure cancer, some complementary or alternative treatments may help relieve some of your symptoms.

One such treatment is acupuncture. During acupuncture treatment, a practitioner inserts tiny needles into your skin at precise points. Research shows that acupuncture may be helpful in relieving nausea and vomiting. Acupuncture might also help relieve certain types of pain in people with cancer.

Be sure to discuss the risks and benefits of complementary or alternative treatment that you're thinking of trying with your doctor. Some treatments, such as herbal remedies, could interfere with medicines you're taking.

Source:

. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/spinal-cord-tumor/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20350108

1What are the side effects of brain tumor surgery?
Brain surgery is a lot for your body to cope with. It might be a while before you feel the benefit from having your tumour removed. ... Immediate side effects weakness. dizzy spells. poor balance or lack of coordination. personality changes. confusion. speech problems. fits (seizures)
2How dangerous is a benign brain tumor?
Malignant and benign (non-cancerous) brain tumors have similar symptoms. They can cause seizures or cause neurologic problems, such as paralysis and speech difficulties. ... Benign tumors can grow but do not spread. There is no way to tell from symptoms alone if a tumor is benign or malignant.
3Can a benign brain tumor kill you?
Benign brain tumours can be serious if they are not diagnosed and treated early. Although they remain in one place and do not usually spread, they can cause harm by pressing on and damaging nearby areas of the brain. ... Read more information about treating a benign brain tumour.
4Is it common to have memory loss after brain surgery?
Epilepsy Study Shows Memory Loss After Brain Surgery. ... However, 12 months later 30% -50% of those patients who experienced surgery to the left temporal lobe showed no recovery of verbal memory, while patients who had surgery on the right side of their brain regained their memory.
5Can a benign brain tumor kill you?
Benign brain tumours can be serious if they are not diagnosed and treated early. Although they remain in one place and do not usually spread, they can cause harm by pressing on and damaging nearby areas of the brain. ... Read more information about treating a benign brain tumour.
6How dangerous is a benign brain tumor?
Malignant and benign (non-cancerous) brain tumors have similar symptoms. They can cause seizures or cause neurologic problems, such as paralysis and speech difficulties. ... Benign tumors can grow but do not spread. There is no way to tell from symptoms alone if a tumor is benign or malignant.
7Do benign tumors need to be removed?
These benign tumors may be removed – or pulverized – for that reason. ... Other types of benign tumors are more likely to cause serious problems. Desmoid fibromatosis can't metastasize as cancer can – or spread to other parts of the body – but it is considered an aggressive type of benign tumor.
8Is memory loss a sign of brain tumor?
But when forgetfulness turns to dramatic memory loss, it might be due to another problem, such as a brain tumor. ... And that's what makes brain tumors different than other types of cancer: It affects the intellectual, cognitive, and emotional abilities.”
9How long does it take for skull to heal after craniotomy?
Recovery. You will be given a follow-up appointment 10 to 14 days after surgery. The recovery time varies from 1 to 4 weeks depending on the underlying disease being treated and your general health. Full recovery may take up to 8 weeks.
10How long can you live with a brain tumor?
The average survival time is 12-18 months - only 25% of glioblastoma patients survive more than one year, and only 5% of patients survive more than five years.
11Can a stroke be mistaken for a brain tumor?
“A lot of the time a brain tumor is mistaken for a stroke,” said Jensen. ... The lateral nature of symptoms observed in stroke patients is also often seen in patients with brain tumors. Patients may complain of “losing” some of their vision on one side, or they may neglect things that happen on one side of the body.
12Is craniotomy a major surgery?
A craniotomy is the surgical removal of part of the bone from the skull to expose the brain. Specialized tools are used to remove the section of bone called the bone flap. The bone flap is temporarily removed, then replaced after the brain surgery has been done.
13Can I drive after brain surgery?
If you have a craniotomy (instead of transphenoidal surgery) you can't drive for 6 months. The DVLA will need medical evidence before you get your licence back. You won't be able to drive for a year after treatment if you have a grade 1 or 2 (slow growing) glioma. Your situation will be reviewed after a year.

2 Comments

  1. Syed Haider Abbas Zaidi Alwasti says:

    Left cerebellum TW2 Tumor size
    In diamensions 2.1 x 1.7 x 1.9 cm (APxTSxCC)

    • Iranian Surgery Adviser says:

      hello dear heider, please contact us through whatsApp if you need any helping hand. this is my whatsApp number +989019290946.

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